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Shortage of care professionals poses crisis for families of those with disabilities

Cindy Vayonis is searching for an activity to do with her daughter. It's winter, so they can't go apple picking. Kennywood, Sandcastle and swimming at a community pool are obviously out as well, she said.

Cindy Vayonis is searching for an activity to do with her daughter. It's winter, so they can't go apple picking. Kennywood, Sandcastle and swimming at a community pool are obviously out as well, she said.

If it's warm enough, Vayonis and her daughter Lexi may take a walk outdoors; otherwise, they head to a grocery store.

“But I can only go to Giant Eagle, Whole Foods and Target so much,” Vayonis said.

Six years ago, Vayonis became Lexi's full-time caregiver.

Lexi, 29, has “intellectual deficits and behavioral issues,” her mother said.

Undertaking Lexi's care was largely due to staffing issues. Each time a new direct support professional tried to work with Lexi, Vayonis received notice that her daughter's “behavioral issues were too difficult,” and the family was dropped as a client.  More here. 
 

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